Includes how foreign exchange is managed and implications for U.S. business;
Last Published: 8/6/2019
Ireland is a member of the European Union (EU) and the European Monetary System (EMS).  Commercial transactions and payment terms therefore reflect common Western practices.  Primary import payment considerations are determined by the financial reputation of an individual customer combined with competitive considerations. There are no commercial foreign-exchange limitations or unusual regulations.  Additionally, there are no restrictions on inward investment, foreign trading, or the repatriation of capital and profits of American firms based in Ireland.

The Irish importer can easily arrange import financing through a local branch bank manager.  Experienced importers respect overseas vendor’s payment terms.  The domestic market operates quite differently, with trade customers taking cash discounts and paying up to 90 or even 180 days after delivery.  Occasionally, new importers attempt to apply domestic practices to the international market place.
 

Prepared by our U.S. Embassies abroad. With its network of 108 offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries, the U.S. Commercial Service of the U.S. Department of Commerce utilizes its global presence and international marketing expertise to help U.S. companies sell their products and services worldwide. Locate the U.S. Commercial Service trade specialist in the U.S. nearest you by visiting http://export.gov/usoffices.



Ireland Market Access Foreign Exchange