This information is derived from the State Department's Office of Investment Affairs’ Investment Climate Statement. Any questions on the ICS can be directed to EB-ICS-DL@state.gov.
Last Published: 7/24/2017

Today only a handful of large SOEs remain, mainly in the transportation, power, extractive and airport management sectors. The largest SOEs are the Ghana Ports and Harbor Authority (GPHA), the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG), the Volta River Authority (VRA), the Tema Oil Refinery (TOR), the Ghana Airport Company Limited (GACL), Ghana Cocoa Board (COCOBOD), Ghana National Gas Company Limited, and GNPC. Many of these receive subsidies and assistance from the government. Ghana has started the process of increasing private sector participation in ECG under its second Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) compact, a program that intends to increase the commercial viability of the utility. In turn, this will drive expanded opportunities for Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to enter the sector.

OECD Guidelines on Corporate Governance of SOEs

While the Government of Ghana does not actively promote adherence to the OECD Guidelines, Corporate governance of SOEs is overseen by the State Enterprise Commission (SEC). The SEC encourages SOEs to be managed like Limited Liability Companies so as to be profit-making. In addition, beginning in 2014 most state-owned enterprises were required to contract and service direct and government-guaranteed loans on their own balance sheet. The government’s goal is stop adding these loans to “pure public” debt, paid by taxpayers directly through the budget.

Sovereign Wealth Funds

Ghana’s only sovereign wealth fund is the Petroleum Holding Fund, which is funded by oil profits and flows to the Ghana Heritage Fund and Stabilization Fund. The Petroleum Revenue Management Act (PRMA), passed in 2011, spells out how revenues from oil and gas should be spent and includes transparency provisions for reporting by government agencies, as well as an independent oversight group, the Public Interest and Accountability Committee (PIAC). Section 48 of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act, 2011 (Act 815) requires the fund to publish an audited annual report by the Ghana Audit Service. The fund’s management meets the legal obligations. Management of the Ghana Petroleum Fund is a joint responsibility between the Ministry of Finance and the Bank of Ghana. The Minister develops the investment policy for the GPF, and is responsible for the overall management of GPF funds, consults regularly with the Investment Advisory Committee and Bank of Ghana Governor before making any decisions related to investment strategy or management of GPF funds. The Minister is also in charge of establishing a management agreement with the Bank of Ghana for the oversight of the funds. The Bank of Ghana is responsible for the day-to-day operational management of the Petroleum Reserve Accounts (PRAs) under the terms of Operation Management Agreement.

http://www.mofep.gov.gh/sites/default/files/reports/petroleum/2015%20Annual%20Report%20on%20the%20Petroleum%20Funds.pdf

Prepared by our U.S. Embassies abroad. With its network of 108 offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries, the U.S. Commercial Service of the U.S. Department of Commerce utilizes its global presence and international marketing expertise to help U.S. companies sell their products and services worldwide. Locate the U.S. Commercial Service trade specialist in the U.S. nearest you by visiting http://export.gov/usoffices.



Ghana Economic Development and Investment