Rules for documenting origin under the US-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement
Last Published: 10/18/2016
Claiming Preferential Treatment
The importer, not the exporter, is required to make a claim of preferential tariff treatment under the U.S.-Bahrain FTA on the basis that the good originates from the U.S. or Bahrain. The Bahraini government determines how claims are made. Although the U.S.-Bahrain FTA specifically obligates the importer with claiming preferential treatment, a U.S. exporter should work with the importer in advance to ensure that the U.S. good meets the rule of origin requirements. It is also recommended that U.S. companies maintain their own supporting records.

Certifying Origin
The Bahrain importer is required to submit a declaration to the customs authorities containing all pertinent information concerning the growth, production, or manufacture of the good to support a claim of preferential treatment. The U.S.-Bahrain FTA establishes a minimum amount of information that may be required, which is: 
  1. a description of the good, quantity, invoice numbers and bills of lading;
  2. a description of the operations performed in the growth, production, or manufacture of the good in the territory of one or both of the Parties and, where applicable, identification of the direct costs of processing operations;
  3. a description of any materials used in the growth, production, or manufacture of the good that are wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of one or both of the Parties, and a statement as to the value of such materials;
  4. a description of the operations performed on, and a statement as to the origin and value of, any foreign materials used in the good that are claimed to have been sufficiently processed in the territory of one or both of the Parties so as to be materials produced in the territory of one or both of the Parties, or are claimed to have undergone an applicable change in tariff classification specified in Annex 3-A or Annex 4-A; and
  5. a description of the origin and value of any foreign materials used in the good that are not claimed to have been substantially transformed in the territory of one or both of the Parties, or are not claimed to have undergone an applicable change in tariff classification specified in Annex 3-A or Annex 4-A.
The Agreement states that the importing Party’s customs authority should request a declaration only when:
  1. that Party has reason to question the accuracy of a deemed certification referred to in subparagraph (a) of Article 4.10,
  2. that Party's risk assessment procedures indicate that verification of a claim is appropriate, or
  3. the Party conducts a random verification.
The importer shall retain all required documentation for five years from the date of importation.

Please note that there are standard export documentation requirements separate from those discussed above for all shipments of goods from the United States to Bahrain.

Prepared by the International Trade Administration. With its network of 108 offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries, the International Trade Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce utilizes its global presence and international marketing expertise to help U.S. companies sell their products and services worldwide. Locate the trade specialist in the U.S. nearest you by visiting http://export.gov/usoffices.



Bahrain US Bahrain Free Trade Agreement