Information on Antiboycott Regulations and restrictive trade practices and how they affect exporters. This information is part of "A Basic Guide to Exporting" provided by the U.S. Commercial Service to assist U.S. companies in exporting.
Last Published: 10/20/2016
The U.S. has an established policy of opposing restrictive trade practices or boycotts fostered or imposed by foreign countries against other countries friendly to the U.S. This policy is implemented through the anti-boycott provisions of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (EAA)—enforced by the U.S. Department of Commerce— and through a 1977 amendment to the Tax Reform Act of 1976—enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Part 760 of the EAR implements the EAA’s anti-boycott provisions. U.S. persons are prohibited from taking certain actions with the intent to comply with, further, or support an unsolicited foreign boycott. Prohibitions include:
  • Refusing to do business with a boycotted or blacklisted entity
  • Discriminating against, or agreeing to discriminate against, any U.S. person on the basis of race, religion, sex, or national origin
  • Furnishing information about business relationships with a boycotted country or a blacklisted entity In addition, the EAR requires a U.S. person to notify the U.S. Department of Commerce if he or she receives a request to comply with an unsanctioned foreign boycotted country or a blacklisted entity.
In addition, the EAR requires a US person to notify the U.S. Department of Commerce if he or she receives a request to comply with an unsanctioned foreign boycott.




Anti Boycott Regulations