This information is derived from the State Department's Office of Investment Affairs' Investment Climate Statement. Any questions on the ICS can be directed to EB-ICS-DL@state.gov
Last Published: 11/2/2016

Afghan awareness of the term “Responsible Business Conduct” is nascent, but the government has encouraged large companies and foreign investors to invest in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Large mining contracts include stipulations for environmental protection and community inclusion. A comprehensive mining law passed in October 2014 requires mining contract holders to consult with communities that will be affected by mining projects and to implement a community development agreement that includes details of the firm’s environmental and social impact assessment. The law also requires extractive sector companies to safeguard and maintain any archeological and cultural relics they come across during the extraction operations until the Afghan government removes them. USAID continues to implement its Mining Investment and Development for Afghan Sustainability (MIDAS) project, a portion of which provides guidance to communities living near mines through training and governance support.

Afghanistan is an Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) candidate country. The 2014 Mining Law requires the Ministry of Mines and Petroleum to comply with the financial reporting requirements and standards of EITI.

A number of the competing mobile network operators have well-developed CSR outreach programs that include health, education, job creation, environmental protection and outreach to refugees. For instance, the largest telecom operator in Afghanistan, Roshan, whose majority owner is the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development, has received recognition for its social responsibility mission, including from Forbes and B Lab as one of the 16 “Best for the World” midsize companies in 2015. In addition, some Afghan entrepreneurs, such as Ihsanullah Bayat, the Barakat Group, the Ghazanfar Group, Hotak Azizi, and the Alokozay Group, have foundations that provide assistance in the fields of health, education, and the eradication of poverty.

OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
Afghanistan is not a subscriber to the OECD Declaration and Decisions on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises.

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Afghanistan Economic Development and Investment