Generalizes on the best strategy to enter the market, e.g., visiting the country; importance of relationships to finding a good partner; use of agents.
Last Published: 7/14/2017

As always, companies should consider their own resources, previous export or business experience abroad, and long-term business strategy before entering the China market. Representation in China by a Chinese agent, distributors, or partners who can provide essential local knowledge and contacts will be critical for success. Intellectual property rights holders should understand how to protect their IP under Chinese law before entering the China market, and should conduct thorough due diligence on potential partners or buyers before entering into any transaction. Foreign companies have a wide range of options for corporate formation in China, including Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprises, Joint Ventures, Representative Offices, and other investment vehicles. Each option has its own advantages, disadvantages, and risks. All companies, IP rights holders, and others should consult closely with lawyers who have extensive experience with the China market, including lawyers based in the United States and China.

The U.S. Department of Commerce, United States Foreign Commercial Service (USFCS) offers customized solutions to help U.S. companies, including small- and medium-sized enterprises, succeed in the China market. USFCS stands ready to help U.S. companies develop comprehensive market entry or expansion plans, learn about export- and customs-related requirements, obtain export financing, and identify potential partners, agents, and distributors through business matchmaking programs, trade shows, and trade missions led by senior U.S. Government officials. For U.S. companies that purchase our Gold Key Service, USFCS can facilitate one-on-one meetings with: pre-screened buyers; potential customers or end-users; experienced professional services providers; and key government officials. Furthermore, by engaging USFCS, U.S. companies can learn how to leverage high-level bilateral policy discussions. With these tools, explained in greater detail in this Country Commercial Guide, U.S. companies will be better positioned to take advantage of opportunities in China’s market.

In addition, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) provides equivalent-level trade services at no cost for U.S. companies interested in exporting agricultural, fishery, and forestry products through their Agricultural Trade Offices. FAS maintains offices in the cities of Beijing, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Shanghai, and Shenyang.  FAS works with USDA agencies and other U.S. food safety-related agencies (in particular, the United States Food and Drug Administration) to coordinate the U.S. response to newly arising sanitary, phytosanitary, and technical barriers to trade, such as identifying and resolving challenges posed by new procedures introduced at port or acquiring, translating, and coordinating the U.S. response to draft regulations that could affect U.S. exports.

 

Prepared by our U.S. Embassies abroad. With its network of 108 offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries, the U.S. Commercial Service of the U.S. Department of Commerce utilizes its global presence and international marketing expertise to help U.S. companies sell their products and services worldwide. Locate the U.S. Commercial Service trade specialist in the U.S. nearest you by visiting http://export.gov/usoffices.


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China Trade Development and Promotion